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News & Features

Apr 2
2014

Navigating Natural

The rules on what foods can make that claim are fuzzy, at best

Most people would agree that nutritious kale in its most pristine and unprocessed form is the epitome of a natural food. Grown in the earth and shipped to the market with little to no packaging or labels needed, fresh, green, leafy kale surely is about as close to natural as you can get.

Mar 31
2014

Shape Up 2.0

Study finds that a Tufts program on healthy living for kids piloted in Somerville, Mass., works elsewhere

On the heels of a successful Tufts project to decrease childhood obesity in urban Somerville, Mass., researchers brought a similar intervention program to rural, low-income areas across the country, where children who took part ended up eating more fruits and vegetables than their peers.

Mar 26
2014

A Diet that Fits Your Genes

Researcher José Ordovas talks about the impact of nutrigenomics on what we eat

The age of one-size-fits-all nutritional advice is coming to a close, thanks to the surging field of nutrigenomics. Soon, individual decisions about whether to focus on Mediterranean-style dining, low-fat foods or a salt-free diet will get easier as we learn more about our genetic makeup and how it interacts with what we eat.

Mar 21
2014

Calm the Baby, but Forgo the Bottle

Study shows that feeding fussy babies to settle them down may lead to weight gain as they get older

Studies have shown that fussy babies—ones who cry often and are more easily distressed—tend to gain more weight and have a higher risk for obesity in childhood. One theory, says Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, a research associate at the Friedman School, is that caregivers of a fussy child are more likely to try feeding him whenever he cries, and that doing so reinforces the idea for the child that he gets to eat when he’s upset.

“It could have repercussions down the lifespan,” she says. (If you’ve ever reached for a pint of ice cream when you were unhappy, you know what she means.)

Recent News Releases

Aug 13
2013

Mediterranean Diet Counteracts a Genetic Risk of Stroke, Study Reports

BOSTON (August 13, 2013, 10 am EDT) -- A gene variant strongly associated with development of type 2 diabetes appears to interact with a Mediterranean diet pattern to prevent stroke, report researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and from the CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutriciόn in Spain.

Jun 26
2013

New Data Support Community-Wide Approach to Addressing Child Obesity

BOSTON (June 26, 2013)— Community wide interventions hold promise as an effective approach to reducing childhood obesity rates according to new research from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and Tufts University School of Medicine.  An analysis of data from the first two school years (20 calendar months) of the Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart Play Hard™ intervention showed that schoolchildren in Somerville, Massachusetts gained less weight and were less likely to be obese or overweight than schoolchildren in two similar control communit

May 13
2013

Independent and Small-Chain Restaurant Meals Exceed Recommended Daily Calorie Needs

 BOSTON, MA (May 13, 2013, 4pm EDT) – As the restaurant industry prepares to implement new rules requiring chains with 20 or more locations to post calorie content information, the results of a new study suggest that it would be beneficial to public health for all restaurants to provide consumers with the nutritional content of their products.  Researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University analyzed meals from independent and small- chain restaurants, which account for approximately 50% of the nation’s res