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News & Features

Oct 20
2014

Train Your Brain to Prefer Healthy Foods

New research shows that it is possible to create new eating habits

“I can resist anything except temptation.” Anyone who has ever been on a diet can relate to that quip from Oscar Wilde. No matter what the fad diet du jour says, the only way to lose weight is to reduce the net number of calories consumed. It’s a simple equation, but a hard way to live.

Oct 17
2014

Magnesium Cuts Diabetes Risk

Only about half of Americans get the recommended daily amount in their diet

Getting enough magnesium in the diet may reduce the risk of diabetes, especially for those who already show signs of heading that way.

A Tufts study led by Adela Hruby, N10, MPH10, N13, found that healthy people with the highest magnesium intake were 37 percent less likely to develop high blood sugar or excess circulating insulin, common precursors to diabetes.

Oct 8
2014

Fighting Epidemics with Food

With better nutrition, we might improve the odds of keeping outbreaks like Ebola in check, writes a researcher

The deadly outbreak of Ebola in West Africa continues to spread, despite heroic efforts on the part of health-care workers. The death rate—estimated at 70 percent of cases—is staggering. Those patients who contract the disease and survive, however, seem to have something in common. Their bodies are able to stand up to the virus’s first attack with a robust immune response, followed by a measured inflammatory response. This keeps the virus from rapidly reproducing and causing lethal damage to key organs.

Oct 6
2014

Fat but Healthy

Some people can pack on the pounds and still avoid the harmful complications of obesity

What if you could gain as much weight as you wanted and remain relatively healthy? For a small percentage of people, that scenario isn’t far-fetched.

We tend to think that obesity and poor health are constant companions. Indeed, studies have shown that being extremely overweight tends to lead to a host of medical problems, including heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes, which develop due to long-term adverse effects on the body’s metabolism.

Recent News Releases

Aug 13
2013

Mediterranean Diet Counteracts a Genetic Risk of Stroke, Study Reports

BOSTON (August 13, 2013, 10 am EDT) -- A gene variant strongly associated with development of type 2 diabetes appears to interact with a Mediterranean diet pattern to prevent stroke, report researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University and from the CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutriciόn in Spain.

Jun 26
2013

New Data Support Community-Wide Approach to Addressing Child Obesity

BOSTON (June 26, 2013)— Community wide interventions hold promise as an effective approach to reducing childhood obesity rates according to new research from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and Tufts University School of Medicine.  An analysis of data from the first two school years (20 calendar months) of the Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart Play Hard™ intervention showed that schoolchildren in Somerville, Massachusetts gained less weight and were less likely to be obese or overweight than schoolchildren in two similar control communit

May 13
2013

Independent and Small-Chain Restaurant Meals Exceed Recommended Daily Calorie Needs

 BOSTON, MA (May 13, 2013, 4pm EDT) – As the restaurant industry prepares to implement new rules requiring chains with 20 or more locations to post calorie content information, the results of a new study suggest that it would be beneficial to public health for all restaurants to provide consumers with the nutritional content of their products.  Researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University analyzed meals from independent and small- chain restaurants, which account for approximately 50% of the nation’s res