Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy Seminar Series

Description: This weekly Wednesday series highlights current scientific and policy research in the field of nutrition. Students and faculty are encouraged to attend and actively participate in discussion.

Day/Time: Wednesdays, 12:15 - 1:15 pm.

Location: Jaharis, Behrakis Auditorium, Boston Campus

Read more, or register for the next seminar

View in Table Format or View & Print the full 2014 Fall schedule PDF

HCOM 544: Professional Communication

0.5
TBD

Professional Communication provides graduate students in nutrition communication with an opportunity to develop skills in the public speaking arena. The course explains the basic concepts, theories, and principles of oral communication as applied to diverse speaking situations. Through practice and critical analysis of skills, students develop competence in oral communication. Students explore the discovery and arrangement of ideas, speech formats (narrative, informative, and persuasive) and styles (formal to informal), audience analysis, the use of evidence and reasoning to support claims, and ethical considerations in communication. Since individuals often enter the health professions without adequate speaking training, this course provides students with valuable skills applicable to future careers in nutrition communication.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
TBD
HCOM0504-01

MPH 201: Principles of Epidemiology

1.0
Tuesdays, 5:30 - 8:30 pm

This course provides an introduction to the epidemiological perspective on health and disease. The course emphasizes the principles and methods used to describe and evaluate the patterns of illness in communities and in population subgroups. Methods and research designs used in the investigation of the etiology of infectious and noninfectious disease are presented. Lecture and laboratory examples illustrate a wide range of contemporary health problems.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
TBD
MPH0201-01

NUTR 202: Principles of Nutrition Science

1.0
Monday and Friday, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

This course presents the fundamental scientific principles of human nutrition. Students will become familiar with food sources; recommended intake levels; biochemical role; mode of absorption, transport, excretion; deficiency/toxicity symptoms, and potential major public health problems for each macro- and micronutrient. The student goals for this course are: 1.) to describe the components of a healthy diet, 2.) understand the major nutrition problems that affect individuals and populations from conception and throughout the life cycle, and 3.) understand the scientific basis for nutritional recommendations brought before the scientific and lay communities.

Students are required to have taken a one semester college-level course in either human biology, chemistry, or physiology (preferred).
Jaharis, Rm #118, Boston Campus
NUTR0202-01

NUTR 203: Fundamentals of Nutrition Policy and Programming: How Science and Practice Interact

1.0
Thursdays, 1:30 - 4:30 pm

Nutrition 203 is a  course that will allow students at the Friedman School to become familiar with policy processes (domestic and international), typologies of policy initiatives (laws, regulations, program interventions, legal restrictions and systems, institutional mandates), and to be able to critically analyze and discuss how policy and science interact with regard to food and nutrition. The class will cover: a) how science influences the policy agenda, and how policy debates influence the scientific agenda; b) the scientific underpinnings of food and nutrition policies; c) how empirical findings in scientific research and operational programming make their way into policy and law; d) debates and controversies in US and international nutrition; e) the range of options for intervention that exist (to improve nutrition), and those that are used; f) how do we know what works best and what the alternatives might be?; g) approaches to problem assessment and measurement; h) success stories in the nutrition pantheon; i) constraints to success (what makes or breaks major program successes), and j) key institutions and organizations involved in nutrition policy and programming in the US and around the world.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Behrakis Auditorium, Boston Campus
NUTR0203-01

NUTR 204: Principles of Epidemiology

1.0
Thursday, 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
CEE 154 (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

Course examines methods that quantify disease processes in human populations. Topics include study design, sources of inaccuracy in experimental and observational studies, the methodology of data collection, and an introduction to the statistical evaluation of epidemiological data.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
ANDN Rm #112, Medford Campus
NUTR0204-01

NUTR 207: Statistical Methods for Nutrition Research (Policy)

1.0
Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:30 - 3:00 pm

Part one of a one-year, two-semester course covering descriptive statistics, graphical displays, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t test, chi-square test, nonparametric tests, multiple linear regression, multiple logistic regression, experimental design, multi-factor and multiple comparisons procedures. Students will learn how to use Stata statistical analysis software.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Behrakis Auditorium, Boston Campus
NUTR0207-01

NUTR 211: Theories of Behavior Change and their Application in Nutrition and Public Health Interventions

1.0
Mondays, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

What motivates people to adopt healthier food and lifestyle choices? This course will explore various theoretical perspectives on nutrition and health-related behavior change. It will include an examination of several individual-based, social-based, organization-based an eco-social theories, including the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Planned Behavior, the Transtheoretical Model, Decision-Making, Social Support, Social Learning Theory, and Diffusion of Innovations. Knowledge of these theories will help inform the design of research and program interventions based on psycho-biological, social, cultural and organizational frameworks. The course emphasizes an understanding of core theory concepts and issues in measurement. In-class workshops will allow for direct application of the theories to students' current research and program intervention interests. The course will provide concepts and tools that can apply not only to the students' own research interests, but also to other courses, such as those focused on nutrition interventions, patient education, persuasive communication, social marketing and mass media. This course should be of great value to students in the Nutrition Communication, Nutrition Epidemiology, Nutrition Intervention Programs and to students in the MS / Dietetic Internship programs.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Rm #156, Boston Campus
NUTR0211-01

NUTR 215: Fundamentals of U.S. Agriculture

1.0
Wednesdays, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
UEP0223 (Department of Urban and Environmental Policy)

This course covers the major social, institutional and human aspects of the American agricultural system, both as it exists today as well as its historical development. After consideration of agricultural systems in general and of the values that underlie different concepts of agriculture, it covers some of the key historical forces that have made American agriculture what it is today, and the major role of the federal government, both past and present. The next part of the course deals with the economics of American agriculture as a whole and its large-scale structure, followed by an analysis of farming on the microlevel, emphasizing types of farms and farm-scale production economics.

TBD
Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Rm #118, Boston Campus
NUTR0215-01

NUTR 220: Introduction to Writing about Nutrition and Health

0.5
Tuesdays, 5:30 - 7:30 pm

This introductory course is designed to teach the basic skills necessary to write nutrition- and health-related papers that are clear, accurate, and audience-appropriate. It is a practical review of writing and revision, and will enable students to develop a clear, fluent, and readable style. The course will include both individual and collaborative exercises and will require several writing and editing assignments, as well as rewrites. It is a prerequisite for NUTR 205 and NUTR 306, both of which build on the skills it provides.

Graduate standing or instructor consent. Enrollment priority is given to 1) Nutrition Communication program students, 2) Nutrition Communication minors.
Jaharis, Rm #118, Boston campus
NUTR0220-01

NUTR 222: Gender, Culture and Conflict in Humanitarian Complex Emergencies

1.0
Fridays, 10:30 - 12:30 pm;
DHP D232 (Fletcher School)

This course will examine humanitarian aid in conflict situations from a gender perspective and highlight the policy and program implications that this dimension presents. Topics covered will include the ways in which gender relations are affected by conflict; the relationship between gender and the militarization of societies and communities; violations of human rights and women's rights; women in peace building and conflict resolution; the gender dynamics of aid and post-conflict reconstruction.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Mazurana
TBD, Medford Campus
NUTR0222-01

NUTR 223: Seminar in Humanitarian Issues

1.0
Fridays, 2:00-4:00 pm

This course is open for credit only to Master of Arts in Humanitarian Assistance (MAHA) students for whom it is a required course. The seminar emphasizes academic and research skills that are important for a professional in the humanitarian field. It also offers MAHA students the chance to explore in greater depth, key issues in humanitarian assistance.  The seminar is also an opportunity to discuss in depth much of the theory and academic literature of other prerequisite courses. The main output is the MAHA capstone project, which is a requirement for graduation. The class is for one credit, and registration will be for the fall semester.  Activities are concentrated in the fall semester, but the seminar also meets occasionally in the spring.  Capstone projects are due in the spring semester

NUTR 229
Medford Campus, room TBA
NUTR0223-01

NUTR 224: Community Food Planning and Programs

1.0
Wednesdays, 3:15 pm - 6:15 pm

Community Food Planning and Programs is now a single-semester full-credit fall course.

Key features of the course include field trips to community / local food and farm programs, guest presenters, and field-based planning projects with area non-profits, public sector agencies, or businesses.

This course will cover (domestic) food and agriculture programs that focus on or operate at the community or regional levels. Such initiatives promote local/regional agriculture and food chain businesses that process, market, and use local or regional food products. In tandem, public sector and NGO initiatives now sponsor programs and policies with a community or urban food system agenda. The focus will be on more complex initiatives such as farm-to-institution projects, regional wholesaling initiatives, and food policy councils.

A major course objective is to provide practical skills and tools for design, strategic planning, and implementation of these programs, including assessments, research, policy components, and funding. We will also provide contextual analyses and critical perspectives of community-based strategies as alternative food systems models. 

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Rm #156, Boston Campus
NUTR-0224

NUTR 225: Introduction to Modern Biology Techniques

0.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

This intensive, short course is designed to familiarize basic science track (BMN, EPI) students with the fundamental techniques used to study biology at the molecular, cell, tissue and whole organism levels. Techniques covered include but are not limited to gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, cell culture and transfection, electrophoresis, western blotting, immunoassays, PCR, transcriptional profiling, cell sorting, microscopy, imaging techniques and bioinformatics. Background web-based assignments will form the basis of a weekly quiz given at the beginning of each class. Discussion of the quiz will occupy the bulk of actual class time, with student participation and creativity contributing significantly to student’s grade. This is a required course for all Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition Students.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
TBD
NUTR0225-01

NUTR 228: Community and Public Health Nutrition

1.0
Wednesdays, 9:00 am- 12:00 pm

This intensive course provides presentations, readings and activities related to the broad range of community-based nutrition research, programs and policies in the US today. Public health efforts in communities are implement in many different types of settings, including community non-profit agencies, worksites, health centers, clinics, hospitals, schools, churches, supermarkets, recreational and sports centers, councils on aging/senior centers, and emergency feeding sites. Students will become familiar with community-based research and programs focused solely on nutrition as well as those in which nutrition is one component. Students will engage in skill-building and participatory activities, as well be introduced to case examples of creative and innovative approaches to community nutrition. Through field visits and guest speakers, students will have an opportunity to dialogue with public health experts and practitioners who can influence community nutrition practice. Upon completion of this course, the students will have a toolbox of skills to utilize and apply in a wide range of practice settings.

NUTR 101 or equivalent. Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Chomitz
Jaharis, Rm #156, Boston Campus
NUTR0228-01

NUTR 229: Humanitarian Action in Complex Emergencies

1.0
Mondays, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
DHP D230 (Fletcher)

This course examines the evolution of the humanitarian action in relation to changes in the operating environment and changes in the international system. This multi-disciplinary course will cover a broad range of subjects, and addresses a number of topics:

  • A historical perspective on humanitarian action;
  • The normative frameworks of humanitarian action - international humanitarian law, humanitarian principles, and codes of conduct;
  • Conceptual frameworks for addressing the protection of life, livelihoods, rights and safety of people caught in complex emergencies;
  • The impact of conflicts and the "global war on terror"on humanitarian space and humanitarian action;
  • The political economy of conflict and humanitarian aid;
  • Methodologies developed to improving the effectiveness and accountability of humanitarian action;
  • The evolving structure of the international humanitarian system;
  • The ethical and practical implications of incorporating human rights in humanitarian action.

The course will rely on a case-study approach to examining these issues, and students will be involved in developing the case studies for presentation in class. By the end of this course students will be aware of the foundations on humanitarian action (International Humanitarian Law, humanitarian principles, different traditions); the historical, legal, social, political and moral context of humanitarian emergencies; the main analytical frameworks used to understand the causes and consequences of complex emergencies; and major forms of humanitarian responses to complex emergencies. Students will understand the complex relationship between humanitarian action and the international environment, the impact of humanitarian emergencies on social relations, and will have a working knowledge of the principles and standards of accountability for engaging in humanitarian response in complex emergencies.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
First Session: Sackler, Rm #812, Boston Campus/Second Session: Sackler, Rm #221, Boston Campus
NUTR0229-01

NUTR 231: Fundamentals of GIS

1.0
Fridays, 9:00am - 12:00pm

Many problems in agriculture, food and nutrition are inherently geographic in nature. For example, livestock production is increasingly concentrated in large feeding operations, leading to new spatial patterns of water and air pollution or foodborne illness. Spatial clustering is equally important for food consumption, nutrition and public health, as in hunger hotspots, food deserts and disease corridors. This course will equip students with the skills needed to capture, analyze and communicate spatial data in geographic information systems (GIS), using a variety of examples from agriculture, food and nutrition.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Sackler, Rm #514, Boston Campus
NUTR0231-01

NUTR 235: Junior Clinical Rotations

0.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

Required of junior standing students enrolled in the Combined Dietetic Internship/Masters Degree program. Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

TBD
NUTR0235-01

NUTR 236: Practicum in Bioresearch Technique

1.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition students must enroll in one practicum in bioresearch techniques. Students who anticipate a career in basic nutritional sciences require extensive laboratory training. Practicums in bioresearch techniques, established as a single, 1.0 credit course, will provide students with an understanding of critical experimental evaluation as well as hands-on experience in essential techniques of modern biology. In the practicum, students will answer a specific biologic question through experimentation. Faculty in participating laboratories will be responsible for providing an overview of the biologic interest of the laboratory, overseeing the development of a specific, defined project, teaching the theory of specific techniques to be employed, and training the students in the application of these techniques. Students will be evaluated through a written report and oral presentation in a laboratory meeting-type setting.

TBD
NUTR0236-01

NUTR 240: Nutrition Science Journal Club

0.0
Tuesdays, 3:30-4:30 pm Note: Classes meet every other week

Enhance graduate students’ understanding of the current state of biochemical and molecular nutrition (b) enhance graduate students’ understanding of the field of nutrition epidemiology and (3) provide experience in reviewing and critiquing research articles. In alternate week sessions, students will critically evaluate peer-reviewed articles for class discussion that reinforce the principles of various research approaches (including in vitro experiments, animal models, observational studies, clinical trials) and analytical methods. This course will also help students to develop their evaluative skills and presentation performance.

All BMN and NEPI MS and PhD students are encouraged to take this course within the first two years of matriculation to the Friedman School. This will be an intellectually stimulating course that will focus on recent findings in the field. In addition to the faculty advisors for this course, other faculty will be encouraged to attend to help facilitate discussions; for each session, faculty with expertise in a topic to be discussed during that class will be invited to participate. This approach also has the benefit of allowing students in their first and second year of the BMN and NEPI programs to meet and interact with a variety of Friedman faculty.

The primary format of this course will be student-selected and -led presentations of recent publications in the nutrition science literature. The course covers two semesters, meeting every two weeks. During the year, all participating students will be required to give at least one PowerPoint presentation, and submit to the class a one-page summary that addresses the study aims, methods and results, and provides a critical assessment of the article. In order to facilitate discussion, the student leading the journal club is strongly encouraged to share discussion questions prior to the class. This will allow fellow students to prepare for the discussion. Presentation dates will be selected at the beginning of the semester. This course will also include two introductory faculty-led lectures on:

1)     Developing the skills and knowledge essential to understanding and critiquing research reports

Effectively communicating the relevant supporting material, results, and conclusions of primary research reports.

HNRCA Mezzanine Conference Room
NUTR0240-01

NUTR 297: Directed Study

1.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

Directed Study is a mechanism for a student to receive academic credit for work completed under the tutelage of a faculty member. This is generally done on a one-to-one basis with the student taking major responsibility for his/her progress. Research conducted in a laboratory during a Directed Study project can be either problem-oriented or technique-based. Directed Studies must be supervised by Friedman School faculty.

Students must register for a Directed Study using the online form

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
TBD
NUTR0297-01

NUTR 303: Determinants of U.S. Food Policy

1.0
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 8:45 am - 10:15 am

Focuses on government food-related programs from an economic and political perspective. Reviews the evolution of a range of policies and programs, analyzing their effects on the U.S. economy and on household consumption and the farm economy, as well as on food consumption at the national, household, and individual level. Existing policies and programs are related to the political and economic environment and to changing food consumption patterns in American society. Food assistance programs (e.g., Food Stamps), nutrition programs, food supply and agricultural price policies, and consumer protection and information are considered.

NUTR 238 or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Rm #118, Boston Campus
NUTR0303-01

NUTR 304: Nutrition, Food Security, and Development

1.0
Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:30 pm

The aim of this course is to introduce current policy and development issues and debate, and to encourage critical analysis of conventional wisdom and generalizations. Focusing on complex interactions among local and global systems, the course seeks to prepare students for employment in the field of international development, be it as practitioners, analysts, teachers or writers. Alternative concepts, data and viewpoints will be explored on key problems in real contexts. Case studies will be drawn on experiences in countries as diverse as Ethiopia, Niger, Thailand, Vietnam, China and Peru. Class assignments: (a) Two short critiques of journal articles or donor policy statements, b) one individual or group presentation (30 minutes) on a current development problem and its potential solutions, and c) a more demanding paper assignment (10-12 pages) for the end of the semester. Grading will be based on the following structure: Paper assignment (35%), Class presentation (35%), Short critiques (30%). Active class participation is expected.

NUTR 203 and NUTR 238, or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Rm #156, Boston Campus
NUTR0304-01

NUTR 305: Nutritional Epidemiology

1.0
Tuesdays - 1:30-3:00pm and on Fridays 8:45am-10:15am

This course is designed for graduate students at either the Master's or Ph.D. level, who are interested in conducting or better interpreting epidemiologic studies relating diet and nutrition to health and disease. There is an increasing awareness that various aspects of diet and nutrition may be important contributing factors in chronic disease. There are many important problems, however, in the implementation and interpretation of nutritional epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this course is to examine epidemiologic methodology in relation to nutritional measures, and to review the current state of knowledge regarding diet and other nutritional indicators as etiologic factors in disease. This course is designed to enable students to better conduct nutritional epidemiologic research and/or to better interpret the scientific literature in which diet or other nutritional indicators are factors under study.

NUTR 201 or 202, NUTR 204, and NUTR 209/309 or NUTR 207/307.
Jaharis, Rm #155, Boston Campus
NUTR0305-01

NUTR 306: Communicating Health Information to Diverse Audiences, Part B

0.5
Wednesdays, 6:00 - 7:30 pm

A review and analysis of how nutrition and health issues are presented by the media. This course will reinforce concrete journalism skills and an understanding of the values and practices required of a competent and thoughtful writer and is structured around class discussions, selected readings, and writing and editing assignments. Classroom discussions and assignments will also focus on how to report controversial issues in nutrition and health.

NUTR 205 and NUTR 220 or instructor consent. Enrollment priority is given to Nutrition Communication program students.
Jaharis, Rm #118, Boston Campus
NUTR306-01

NUTR 311: Nutrition Data Analysis

1.0
Fridays 1:30-4:30pm

This course will cover knowledge of advanced Stata statistical computing, data base construction, error detection and correction; creation of composite variables; descriptive statistics; univariate analyses, including ANOVA, regression, and factor analysis; and the construction of scales and factor scores. Students pose a research question, identify appropriate statistical techniques for answering the research question, perform the analyses and report on the results in an article suitable for publication in an academic journal. Advanced Stata programming will be taught in weekly hands on lab sessions.

NUTR 207 and NUTR 307 or instructor consent.
Sackler, Rm #507, Boston Campus
NUTR0311-01

NUTR 315: Applied Nutritional Biochemistry

1.0
Thursdays, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

This course will focus on human nutrition and metabolism. Emphasis will be placed on the biological ramifications of altering substrate load and essential nutrients caused by intended and unintended changes in dietary intake. The functional and regulatory roles of macronutrients and micronutrients will be stressed. Additional components of the course will include integrating nutrition policy with nutrition science. Students will be guided in connecting the lay and scientific literature in the areas of biochemistry and nutrition, and exploring how each informs the other. Opportunities will be available for preparing short written reports and oral presentations on contemporary research issues related to the essential nutrients and current topics. Current challenges in the field of nutrition will be related to the lecture material.

NUTR 201 or 202 or equivalent and one undergraduate level biochemistry course taken within the past five years, or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Rm #156, Boston Campus
NUTR0315-01

NUTR 317: Positive Deviance for Behavior Change: A Course for Practitioners

1.0
Wednesdays 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Positive Deviance provides a unique approach for solving problems that require social or behavioral change. At its heart is the observation that in every community there are a few individuals – "positive deviants" – whose uncommon practices or behaviors enable them to outperform or find better solutions to pervasive problems than their neighbors with whom they share the same resource base. Identifying the positive deviants' special practices/behaviors reveals hidden resources already present in the environment, from which it is possible to devise solutions to pervasive community problems - solutions that are sustainable as well as cost-effective. In this course, students will explore the use of the PD Approach in Nutrition. In addition, students will review and critique past and present community based PD inspired nutrition rehabilitation for maternal and child health, including PD Hearth. This course is intended to provide students with a foundation for program design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation for PD Nutrition programs.

Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U). Course enrollment is limited to 20.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Jaharis Rm #155, Boston Campus
NUTR0317-01

NUTR 321: Nutritional Impact on the Immune System and Related Diseases

0.5
Wednesdays, 3:15 - 4:45 pm

This special topics course will review the impact of various nutrients (in both deficient and supplemental states) on maintaining the homeostasis of the immune system during physiological and pathological states as well as during different developmental stages of life. The implications for disease development and/or prevention will be discussed. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the mechanism of nutrients' effect on the immune system at biochemical, molecular and cellular levels. The role of nutrient status in maintaining "optimal" immune function and "disease prevention" and its implications for determining the recommended dietary allowance will be discussed.

NUTR 201 or 202 and prior course in immunology preferred.
Jaharis, Rm #118, Boston Campus
NUTR0321-01

NUTR 323: Intermediate Biostatistics: Regression Methods

1.0
Mondays, 530 pm - 8:30 pm
MPH 206

This course provides a survey of regression techniques for outcomes common in biomedical and public health data including continuous, count, binary, and time series data. Emphasis is on developing a conceptual understanding of the application of these techniques to solving problems, rather than to the numerical details.

MPH 205 with a grade B or better, or NUTR209A with a grade B- or better. Students who wish to use other statistics course as prerequisites please gather a syllabus of the said course and contact the course director for consent before the end of the add/drop period.
Jaharis, Behrakis Auditorium, Boston Campus
NUTR0323-01

NUTR 325: Science Base for Interventions and Prevention of Child Malnutrition

1.0
Mondays 1:30pm-4:30pm

This course will translate the evidence base for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis and therapeutic approaches to child malnutrition (stunting wasting) in developing countries.  The participation of protein quality and micronutrients will be emphasized including iron, vitamin A, zinc and folate.  Current interventions in the field will be analyzed and discussed with emphasis on program design effectiveness evaluation and meta analyses.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
Jaharis, Rm #156, Boston Campus
NUTR0325-01

NUTR 333: Agricultural Science and Policy (II)

1.0
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Second part of a two-semester sequence required of AFE students. This course covers the major biological, chemical and physical components of agricultural systems. Each is discussed from the viewpoints of both the underlying natural processes and principles, and their significance for major agricultural, food safety, and environmental policy issues in the US today. In this second semester, the topics are best management practices, livestock systems, food systems, climate change and bio-energy. Major policy issues associated with these areas include protecting groundwater from nitrogen contamination; regulating and monitoring pesticide use; regulating agricultural biotechnology; and regulating "factory" animal production.

NUTR 215 and NUTR 233
Jaharis, Rm #118, Boston Campus
NUTR0333-01

NUTR 335: Senior Clinical Rotations

0.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

Required of senior standing students enrolled in the Combined Dietetic Internship/Masters Degree program. Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
TBD
NUTR0335-01

NUTR 370: Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology: Macronutrients

1.5
Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:00am - 1:00pm; Fridays, 1:30 - 3:30 am

Required of all students in the Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition and Nutritional Epidemiology programs. The course will expand understanding of the biological roles of nutrients and their metabolism using basic knowledge in physiology, biochemistry, cell biology and molecular biology. It will integrate information on the roles of macronutrients in nutrition and health especially on their relationship to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, as well as provide a forum for discussing the experimental approaches to studying macronutrient metabolism and function. NUTR 370 is an advanced course in the nutrition sciences and will cover topics related to carbohydrates and energy metabolism, fiber, protein and amino acids, and lipids. Students are expected to be familiar with the material covered in NUTR 202, as well as the biochemistry and physiology courses offered at Tufts.

NUTR 201 or 202, Biochemistry 223, NUTR 208, or equivalent.
Jaharis, Rm #155, Boston Campus
NUTR0370-01

NUTR 399: Doctoral Candidacy Preparation

0.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

Students should register for this course while preparing for the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination in order to remain in active status. Full time equivalent – grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

TBD
NUTR0399-01

NUTR 403: Ph.D. Thesis Only

0.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

All doctoral students must register for NUTR403 every semester to remain in active and full time status (full time equivalent.) Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

TBD
NUTR0403-01

NUTR 404: Food and Nutrition Policy Doctoral Research Seminar

0.0
Thursdays, 12:00 - 1:30 pm

This seminar is designed to offer doctoral students a forum for discussing issues, methodologies, and research findings at a higher plane of analysis. Will represent a venue for in-depth, cross-disciplinary exploration of challenging topics. Under the direction of one or more faculty members, students will be expected to facilitate topic discussions and guide each other's research, evaluate methods, and critique research findings, often in fields outside of nutrition. Students will be actively challenged to explore cutting-edge topics in innovative ways. The seminar offers students an opportunity to apply new methodologies or insights directly to their own work and return to the seminar at different stages of preparation for further review. In addition, students will develop more presentational skills, and learn the art of giving and receiving constructive criticism. Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

NOTE: FPAN PH.D. REQUIREMENT. Food Policy and Applied Nutrition doctoral candidates are required to fulfill at least two semesters during the period of their doctoral program; participation by FPAN doctoral students beyond the requirement two is strongly encouraged. Strongly recommended for doctoral students in the (former) World Hunger, US Food and Nutrition Issues programs and AFE program. Other doctoral students are welcome.

The seminar is open to doctoral program students or Masters-level students already admitted to the doctoral program. Other Masters students may be considered only with instructor's consent.
Jaharis, Conference Rm #254, Boston Campus
NUTR0404-01

NUTR 497: Directed Study

1.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

Directed Study is a mechanism for a student to receive academic credit for work completed under the tutelage of a faculty member. This is generally done on a one-to-one basis with the student taking major responsibility for his/her progress. Research conducted in a laboratory during a Directed Study project can be either problem-oriented or technique-based. Directed Studies must be supervised by Friedman School faculty

Students must register for a Directed Study using the online form

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
TBD
NUTR0497-01

NUTR 501: Research Practicum

0.0
Days and times to be arranged with the instructor

Required of Post-Doctoral and Training Grant Fellows. Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Graduate standing or instructor consent.
TBD
NUTR0501-01